Ray Willard

Chair

Washington State Department of Transportation

 Olympia

Ray Willard is a landscape architect and the roadside maintenance program manager at the Washington State Department of Transportation. A 30-year department employee, he has been working on the state's integrated, roadside vegetation management for the past 20 years. The primary focus of his work has been creating and refining the statewide system for long-term planning and controlling roadside weeds using a process modeled on the principles of Integrated Pest Management. Mr. Willard worked on the legislation creating the Washington Invasive Species Council and has been participating in the council's work since its inception. He is a graduate of the University of Washington with a bachelor's degree in landscape architecture and has been licensed as a landscape architect in Washington since 1990. He is a past president of the National Roadside Vegetation Management Association, former chair and current member of the National Transportation Research Board's committee on roadside maintenance operations, and past president of the Washington State Weed Association.

Pat Stevenson

Vice Chair

Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians

 Arlington

Pat Stevenson serves as the Stillaguamish Tribe’s natural resource director where he oversees all of the programs including habitat restoration and protection, harvest and hatchery, water quality, shellfish and wildlife. Mr. Stevenson also co-chairs a local watershed salmon recovery committee, the Stillaguamish Watershed Committee. His previous experience includes working with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to eradicate gypsy moths in Bellingham and working on fish passage and habitat restoration development programs for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He received a bachelor of science degree from Huxley College and a master's degree from Western Washington University.

Bill Tweit

Past Chair

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

 Olympia

Bill Tweit is the Columbia River and distant waters policy lead for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He has been with the agency for 21 years. In addition to serving on the Invasive Species Council, his current responsibilities include managing fisheries in the Columbia basin, working to improve fish survival in the Columbia River hydrosystem, securing mitigation for impacts to fish and other wildlife in the Columbia basin caused by construction and operation of dams, and representing Washington State on the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council. Before joining the department, he worked as a fisheries biologist for the Nisqually Indian Tribe and also the Squaxin Island Tribe. Mr. Tweit received a bachelor's degree in ecology and field biology from The Evergreen State College.

Trade Supervisor and Operations Manager

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

 Seattle

This council member is the operations manager of the agricultural program of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection at its Seattle field office.

Steve Burke

King County

 Seattle

For nearly 20 years, Steve Burke, the manager of the King County Noxious Weed Control Program, has worked on various aspects of invasive species management. With his honors degree in forest science from the University of Melbourne, Steve provided forestry extension services to landowners in Victoria, Australia. Following his interest in windbreaks and other agroforestry systems, he researched crop responses to windbreaks in Southeastern Australia resulting in a master’s degree in agricultural science and the book “Windbreaks." He managed statewide programs in community forestry and revegetation, and statewide programs in pest and plant, and animal management programs for the Victorian State Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Immediately before taking his current position, Mr. Burke worked for an environmental consulting firm on ecosystem restoration and regulatory compliance projects in Washington, California, and Alaska.

Clinton Campbell serves as the state operations coordinator of the Plant Protection and Quarantine program in Washington and Alaska under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. He has been with Department of Agriculture for 13 years and before that worked in state agriculture departments in Washington, Oregon, California, and Hawaii. He has worked on agricultural and invasive species issues in those same states and in Alaska. His years in Hawaii alone, dealing with invasive insects, plant diseases, mollusks, and weeds, helped form a base of invasive species experience that is second to none. Mr. Campbell is an entomologist by training with bachelor, master, and doctorate degrees in entomology from Washington State University and the University of Idaho. He was a post-doctoral fellow with the University of Hawaii-Manoa.

Pat DeHaan has worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service since 2004 and is the deputy project leader for the Western Washington Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office in Lacey. Mr. DeHaan oversees the population and habitat assessment team within the office. Its work focuses on fish and aquatic conservation throughout Puget Sound, the Olympic Peninsula, and coastal Washington and involves population assessment and monitoring as well as aquatic habitat restoration. Before his job in Lacey, he worked as a geneticist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Longview, WA. He received his bachelor and master degrees from Michigan State University.

Kendall Farley

Northwest Power and Conservation Council

 Olympia

Kendall Farley is a policy analyst for the Washington members of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, where she works on balancing energy and wildlife priorities in the Columbia River hydropower system. She has worked on environmental issues in both state and federal governments, staffing Washington members in Congress and in the Washington State Senate on topics such as ocean acidification, Puget Sound restoration, and coastal marine spatial planning. She chairs the Olympia-Capitol Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, working with volunteers to educate the public on protecting beaches and coastal areas. Ms. Farley received a degree in journalism and environmental studies from Western Washington University.

Mary Fee, executive secretary for the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board, started her career in noxious weed management as the Ferry County Noxious Weed Control Board coordinator. While managing on-the-ground control efforts of eastern Washington noxious weeds, she also worked with cooperative weed management groups and partner agencies. Leading up to her employment at Ferry County, she studied biology and environmental chemistry at Eastern Washington University. Ms. Fee also has gained valuable knowledge on western Washington noxious weed identification, control measures, and project management through her employment as a noxious weed control specialist for the King County Noxious Weed Control Program. Working in both eastern and western Washington, and for one of the smallest and the largest county governments in the state, has given her a unique perspective of noxious weed control efforts throughout Washington State.

Todd Hass

Puget Sound Partnership

 Tacoma

Todd Hass oversees special projects at the Puget Sound Partnership. Since joining the agency in 2010, his work has focused on building regional consensus and analytical tools, especially in supporting strategic recovery planning and marine science and maritime management, and advancing oil spill policy and vessel traffic risk assessment in the Salish Sea. In addition to serving on the Invasive Species Council, he is an active member of the Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee and Puget Sound Ecosystem Monitoring Program. He graduated from the University of Washington with a bachelor of science degree in zoology and a doctorate in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After graduate school, Mr. Hass returned to the University of Washington as a researcher and lecturer, where he specialized in citizen science and taught several ecology and conservation courses. He now serves as an affiliate assistant professor in the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington.

Anna Lyon

Okanogan County

 Okanogan

Anna Lyon is the coordinator of the Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board, a position she has held since 2006. She started at the weed board in 1998 as a field inspector, performing on-the-ground control work, surveys, and enforcement. Ms. Lyon has extensive experience working across jurisdictional boundaries on invasive species management. She is a partner in three different Coordinated Weed Management Areas–Okanogan, Weeds Cross Borders, and the International Control of Invasive Aquatic Vegetation for the Upper Columbia River System.

Joseph Maroney

Kalispel Tribe of Indians

 Usk

Joe Maroney has been with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians since January 1995 and serves as the director of Fishery and Water Resources. He manages 3 programs and 22 employees. He has a vast knowledge of Columbia River basin resource management issues and their impacts on anadromous and resident fish resources. Mr. Maroney's entire career has been spent working on hydropower relicensing and implementation across Washington, Idaho, and Montana. He was a two-time chairman of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority representing resident fish managers. Mr. Maroney has worked on bull trout recovery, main stem fish passage, and non-native fish suppression and eradication projects focused on northern pike and brook trout.

Heidi McMaster

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

 Boise, ID

Heidi McMaster is the Pacific Northwest regional hazmat and invasive species coordinator for the federal Bureau of Reclamation. She previously worked in the Lower Colorado Regional Office for 7 years before moving to the Pacific Northwest. Ms. McMaster obtained her master's degree in public health in environmental and occupational health from the University of Nevada Las Vegas and has a bachelor degree in environmental studies focusing on restoration ecology. She previously worked on the Yucca Mountain Project as a Department of Energy contractor and is a U.S. Army Disabled Veteran (Chemical Operations Specialist).

Todd Murray

Washington State University

 Pullman

Todd Murray has more than 20 years of experience working with exotic pests in agriculture, home horticulture, and natural resources. Currently, he is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Unit director for Washington State University Extension. The unit has 45 faculty serving the diverse needs of the agricultural and natural resource communities in all regions of Washington. Mr. Murray received a bachelor of science degree in biology from the University of Illinois-Chicago and a master of science degree in entomology from Washington State University.

Blain Reeves is an assistant manager for the Aquatic Resources Division in the Washington Department of Natural Resources. His responsibilities include aquatic invasive species management, wildstock geoduck fishery management, aquatic science, and geographic information systems. Mr. Reeves has worked for natural resources agencies in Washington for almost 22 years, the first 3 years coordinating the statewide spartina eradication effort for the Washington Department of Agriculture and 19 years at the Department of Natural Resources working as a marine ecologist, environmental planner, and assistant division manager since 2009. He received a bachelor’s degree with a focus on marine ecology from The Evergreen State College.

Karen Ripley

U.S. Forest Service

 Portland

Karen Ripley is a forest entomologist and forest health monitoring coordinator for the U.S. Forest Service in Portland. She also produces wildfire information as a member of one of the Northwest’s eight Type 2 incident management teams. Ms. Ripley has a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Whitman College and a master of science degree in silviculture and forest protection (entomology) from the University of Washington. She worked as a gypsy moth trapper in the early 1990s when Asian gypsy moth were found in Washington, and subsequently helped organize a massive trapping effort to ensure that eradication efforts had been successful. She spent 23 years as the manager of the Forest Health Program for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, providing private forest landowners and state land managers education, technical assistance, and financial assistance to meet diverse forest health goals.

Shaun Seaman

Chelan County Public Utility District

 Wenatchee

Shaun Seaman is the manager of Chelan Public Utility District's External Affairs Program. He has worked for the utility district for 24 years in roles ranging from commercial and industrial energy conservation engineer to director of the customer service and natural resources departments. The Chelan Public Utility District owns and operates the Rocky Reach and Rock Island hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River as well as the Lake Chelan hydroelectric project. The utility district has done extensive work to develop and implement an invasive species monitoring plan to prevent infestations, especially from zebra and quagga mussels, which could threaten generation capacity and Endangered Species Act-listed fish. Mr. Seaman received his bachelor of science degree from The Evergreen State College and an engineering management certificate from Washington State University's graduate school of engineering.

Lizbeth Seebacher

Washington State Department of Ecology

 Lacey

Lizbeth Seebacher is a wetland and aquatic biologist for the Washington State Department of Ecology. She is the program manager for the aquatic plants and freshwater algae programs concentrating on invasive aquatic plants and lake restoration. Ms. Seebacher has been involved with invasive plant issues for 15 years working with nonprofit, federal, and county organizations. She has worked as a wetland biologist with the Army Corps of Engineers focusing on wetland mitigation compliance and as the coordinator of the Pacific Northwest Invasive Plant Council. She has a master of science degree in estuarine wetland restoration and a doctorate in freshwater wetland restoration with a focus on invasive species biology, both from the University of Washington.

Ian Sinks

Columbia Land Trust

 Vancouver

Ian Sinks is the stewardship director for the Columbia Land Trust and has been with the land trust since 1998, first as a volunteer and board member and as staff since 2000. Mr. Sinks is responsible for overseeing the stewardship program, which manages more than 20,000 acres of habitat conservation lands throughout the lower Columbia River region. His responsibilities include supporting conservation planning, evaluating new conservation sites, preparing baseline and management plans, restoring habitat, and monitoring as part of an adaptive management approach. His work includes restoration of intertidal wetland, in-stream, and oak habitats, and implementation of sustainable forestry. Identification and management of invasive species are a core element of habitat conservation work. Before working with land trust, Mr. Sinks worked as an environmental consultant and as a Peace Corps volunteer with the Malawi Department of National Parks and Wildlife. He has a bachelor of science degree in biology from the Lewis and Clark College and continuing education in watershed and resource management, ecology, and habitat restoration.

Andrea Thorpe is the Natural Resources Program Manager at the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission. In this position, she is responsible for guiding the natural resource stewardship throughout Washington’s state parks system. She also serves as an affiliate assistant professor in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington. Prior to working with Parks, she was the Washington Natural Heritage Program Manager in the Department of Natural Resources. She has also worked for the National Ecological Observatory Network and Institute for Applied Ecology. Andrea has a doctorate in ecology (focused on impacts of invasive plants on plant and microbial communities and nutrient cycling) from the University of Montana, a masters in ecology (focused on the population ecology of a rare plant) from San Diego State University, and bachelor of science in natural resources from Oregon State University.

Brad White is the assistant director of the Washington State Department of Agriculture's Plant Services Division. He started his career with the department in 1998 as the managing entomologist and was promoted to manager of the Pest Program, and then to assistant director for the Plant Services Division. In his current position, he leads staff and works with the industry and communities to aid in agricultural commerce and protect the environment.

B. Luke Woods

U.S. Coast Guard

 Seattle

Luke Woods is a Lieutenant Commander with the Thirteenth District for the U.S. Coast Guard.